February 21, 2024
Major points of misinformation from the week


Get the Facts: Major points of misinformation from the week

Updated: 6:03 PM CST Jan 20, 2024

A new, regular series titled “Get the Facts” has been launched to address and correct major points of misinformation from the week, with a particular focus on political claims. This initiative began with Monday’s Iowa caucuses, marking the official start of the presidential election cycle.Claim 1: “This the third time we’ve won,” said former President Donald Trump. However, this claim is inaccurate. In reality, this is only the second time Trump has won the Iowa caucuses. He finished second in 2016, with Sen. Ted Cruz emerging as the actual winner. At that time, Trump baselessly accused Cruz of stealing the election.Claim 2: “Remember they said if you take a COVID shot, you will not get COVID. How true was that? Not at all. Now, every booster you take, you’re more likely to get COVID as a result of it,” said Gov. Ron DeSantis, a Republican presidential candidate said to a New Hampshire crowd. This statement misrepresents how vaccines and boosters work. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) explains that vaccines won’t prevent you from catching a virus. Instead, they teach your body how to fight the infection, reducing the likelihood of becoming seriously ill or dying if you do contract the virus. According to the CDC, “COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective and it recommends boosters, stating, “as with other vaccine-preventable diseases, you are best protected from COVID-19 when you stay up to date with the recommended vaccinations.”In this claim, DeSantis simply stated “they” as the source of his statement and never attributed it to a specific person. It is important to note that during a town hall event in 2021, President Joe Biden incorrectly stated, “You’re not going to get COVID if you have these vaccinations.” Claim 3: A viral social media post claimed that Nikki Haley wasn’t eligible to be president because her parents were not U.S. citizens when Haley was born in South Carolina. However, this claim is false. Haley is, in fact, a citizen and eligible to run for president. This is based on the 14th Amendment of the Constitution, which states: “All persons…born in the United States…are citizens of the United States.”

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A new, regular series titled “Get the Facts” has been launched to address and correct major points of misinformation from the week, with a particular focus on political claims. This initiative began with Monday’s Iowa caucuses, marking the official start of the presidential election cycle.

Claim 1: “This the third time we’ve won,” said former President Donald Trump.

However, this claim is inaccurate. In reality, this is only the second time Trump has won the Iowa caucuses. He finished second in 2016, with Sen. Ted Cruz emerging as the actual winner. At that time, Trump baselessly accused Cruz of stealing the election.

Claim 2: “Remember they said if you take a COVID shot, you will not get COVID. How true was that? Not at all. Now, every booster you take, you’re more likely to get COVID as a result of it,” said Gov. Ron DeSantis, a Republican presidential candidate said to a New Hampshire crowd.

This statement misrepresents how vaccines and boosters work. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) explains that vaccines won’t prevent you from catching a virus. Instead, they teach your body how to fight the infection, reducing the likelihood of becoming seriously ill or dying if you do contract the virus. According to the CDC, “COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective and it recommends boosters, stating, “as with other vaccine-preventable diseases, you are best protected from COVID-19 when you stay up to date with the recommended vaccinations.”

In this claim, DeSantis simply stated “they” as the source of his statement and never attributed it to a specific person. It is important to note that during a town hall event in 2021, President Joe Biden incorrectly stated, “You’re not going to get COVID if you have these vaccinations.”

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Claim 3: A viral social media post claimed that Nikki Haley wasn’t eligible to be president because her parents were not U.S. citizens when Haley was born in South Carolina.

However, this claim is false. Haley is, in fact, a citizen and eligible to run for president. This is based on the 14th Amendment of the Constitution, which states: “All persons…born in the United States…are citizens of the United States.”